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Bookshlf Curator Spotlight: In Conversation with Drew FitzGerald, Co-founder of 501CTHREE

By Bookshlf Editorial - May 5, 2021

We’re excited to welcome 501CTHREE.org to the Bookshlf Community. Founded by Jaden Smith and Drew FitzGerald, 501CTHREE.org is a new type of nonprofit for a younger generation focused on Energy, Food, Water and Shelter.

Bookshlf sat down with Drew FitzGerald to learn about the organization’s mission and plans for the future. 501CTHREE is the first nonprofit to partner with Bookshlf to curate content which educates and empowers a new generation of activists, and we ask that you consider making a donation to the organization by visiting their Bookshlf profile today.


Bookshlf
: Drew, prior to working in the Climate space you had an extensive background as a creative and storyteller -- are there specific pieces of content, projects or creatives that have been particularly inspirational to you throughout your career?


Drew FitzGerald
: That’s a great question. When someone renders themselves as wanting to pursue the arts - and I recognized that very early on - it gives you license to think like an artist and explore like an artist, there’s no stigma or confidence issues. I’ve noticed this when parents encourage their kids to explore artistry early on it gives them license to be something. I think a lot of people, when they realize they have artistic urges later in their life, it’s a longer journey for them to develop an artistic confidence, and so thankfully, by the great support of my parents I was identified as having some artistic qualities early on and so I started my journey and my pursuit of enjoying art; going to museums and thinking how can I make this part of my life going forward, and not necessarily in the most fine art way, but looking at design and being affected by it and appreciating craftsmanship, and industrial design, and appreciating the shape of things.  So throughout a long career, my art has always been about storytelling, and there are people who have affected me early on; impressionism was really eye catching, I know that’s a little cliche now, moving from that to the built engineered environment, and the time I spent in Italy learning about Brunelleschi and da Vinci, and specifically the engineering side of da Vinci, who was always thought of as an artists, but he was really an engineer, he built armements, he built airplanes, he built all sorts of stuff. Brunelleschi, who built the Duomo in the center of Florence, wasn’t even an engineer, he was a blacksmith. He was an artist who got the job and created one of the most important structural elements still standing in Europe today. 

And so, as a storyteller and someone who looks at things from an artist's standpoint there's people like Bruce Mau to Neville Brody, at different points of your career that are arts and the intersection of technology. 

When I started my career in New York, art was being affected by Adobe programs, this was before photoshop even had layers, this was Photoshop 1.0, and there was a book that came out called The Graphic Language by Neville Brody, and he was really the first person to explore how the Mac computer was affecting graphic design, it hit the scene and it was just so influential. My Neville Brody book is tattered, its worn, I’ve poured over it, and that was something that really set me off on my journey, which is the first part of my career really working in commercial art and advertising that led me into the Music Industry of all places in a very unusual backsetting, not just like rock-n-roll. I got a job as an art director for Urban Music (Hip-Hop and R&B). I was the only white guy in the department, I didn’t even know if I’d be good at it, but I really excelled at it and really enjoyed it. This was right at the height of when hip-hop was about to blow up, Uptown, Puffy, BadBoy, DefJam, and I got an opportunity to work on things that were not necessarily something that I studied in college or anything, I was working in the thriving commercial environment of hip-hop and R&B which had all of its interesting personalities and celebrities and labels, and that’s when The Source and VIBE were the only games in town and we were designing for that cultural sphere. But in my personal artistic pursuits outside of work  at that point in my life I was really into Neville Brody, as I started ascending beyond I got really into industrial designers like Phillipe Starcke and Alberto Alessi, then some of the architectural designer slike Rem Koolhaas, and Bruce Mau and was influenced by their books, and then Dieter Rams and then the legacy that is Herman Miller from a company standpoint. So what’s exciting for me goes week to week, and moment to moment, and project to project because they’re so diverse; in different facets and different fields, whether it’s climate change or industrial design or textile design or surface pattern design, and what my mood is and I enjoy that with the diversity of options of things that inspire me. 


Bookshlf
: How did JUST Water get started and how was it a catalyst for starting 501CTHREE?


Drew FitzGerald
: I met Jaden when he was much younger, about 10 years ago, and he and I just got along. Arguably he’s the more mature of both of us. He had a lot of questions and I had worked with the [Smith] family from more of an artistic side. Around 2008-09 I started to really pay attention to things that were wearing on me, mainly Climate Change, and getting to the understanding of it, like, I need to know more about this. And I don’t only want to know about the effects I want to know about the solutions, and that was right around the time that Jaden (and his sister) to some extent would come and ask me questions like “How do solar panels work? How do we get an electric car?” “Why is there plastic in the ocean and what can we do about it?”  

And so, as the joke kinda goes, they would go to their dad and their dad would say go talk to mom. Jada and I have a nice relationship, so she would say to them you should go talk to Drew about this, he seems like the type of fellow who might want to track down the answers. So they put their school right next to my office and they would just wander into my office and say things like “I need to know everything about extreme weather events,” and “What are greenhouse gases?” And so, it started to become a routine thing, and I loved doing it because they would ask very adolescent questions, so I needed to go find out the complexity of the answer and bring it down empirically to them, and that was my own course to study. And so I said to mom and dad “I’m really enjoying this, I’m going to go and I’m going to pivot my career a bit to really look at what service I can play as a creative in the climate change conversation and the solution conversation.” And I had said what would be helpful for me and for the kids is will you send me to MIT so that I can get a crash course in everything, and they said “sure, absolutely” and that was back in 2010 probably, and I fell in love with the place, and when I arrived in Cambridge and started to explore, with the help of some real experts, one of the things I felt was a real sense of relief, that oh my god there is a literal city state of people that are all working on problems, this is what top engineers do, they look at a million ways to crack a code on something, and I said look, this is an environment with the type of mentality that this younger generation of problem solvers needs to support and cultivate and I wish I could bring all the anxiety and the angst ridden generation of Jaden and WIllow to MIT and say, “Breathe for a minute… look there are really, really, really smart people working on this and what we need to do is to be supportive of them. These young beautiful minds are working on problems that are bigger than themselves for the reason of bettering humanity whether the outcome is a billion dollar startup or furthering the progression of science. The MIT community and others like them are on the case.”

So when you talk about Climate Change it’s always a conversation of Economics, 100%. How are we going to pay for this? How are we going to modernize the grid? How are electric cars going to be competitive with combustion engines? Solar panels are cheap now, they’re on par with coal and oil, but when I started they were not. There was no way solar was going to beat fossil fuels. That’s changed, so it’s all economics. Macro and micro. So when I started with the kids and they had all these questions like, “We need more solar panels, why aren’t we powering the entire state of California with solar?” I was like well, this is turning from a conservation and sustainability class to a business class. We need to talk about the economics of this. So really early on I said, let’s look at the economics, let’s look at the fundamental underpinnings of why we're either deteriorating the environment or what we’re doing to solve it, and a lot of those underpinnings were economic. 

So I said, “Listen, why don’t we, as a “class project” create a mock-business in the economic sphere and create it considering everything across the board from where we put it, who we hire, how we acquire our products, what the products are packaged in, and what are our emissions? How are we decreasing them? How can we constantly get more efficient? And what market will buy these products.” It could be cars, clothes, whatever, and we landed on bottled water, because it was obviously very vilified and ubiquitous in global culture. You see the plastic pollution. Plastic is easily and demonstrably a villain. Although it does serve some purposes in our lives. 

So we looked at it and said we want to rip down the idea of bottled water company and build it up in the way we see fit, both from a social, environmental and material standpoint, and we came up with a name JUST, we found a package - I actually found it in a garbage can in Italy, that I dusted off and brought home in my luggage, called the company and said can we get some samples and that was the beginning of JUST Water and were proud to see the performance of where JUST Water is in terms of where it is in multiple countries and the reduction of CO2 and the reduction of plastic that we perform.  

And so JUST is alive and going, but we had a lot of energy left in our tanks and we learned so much about water engineering and we learned so many things along the journey of creating a for-profit company that looks at reducing the material inputs and greenhouse gasses that we said listen we can add to a bigger conversation of being philanthropic, and be philanthropic in a way that is understood by this generation. I’m not sure this generation really connects with more established philanthropy and understands what they do. They serve their purpose, there are wonderful philanthropies throughout the world, but there's room for innovation in philanthropic giving and ideas. So we said why don’t we try to educate a generation about the issues that we care about, the mission and the values and why don’t we start that even with the name, it’s like calling your nonprofit “nonprofit” and we literally called it 501CTHREE because from the get-go we wanted to be educating and making anyone of any generation, but largely Jaden’s generation, just smarter and more informed about how nonprofits work, how you can get involved, what are some of the issues that we care about, and why you should too. And it’s not just “Hey we’re going to go off and do stuff, it’s “hey come with us, we’ll show you how it’s done.” 

So we’re looking at obviously justice, and the intersectionality of race and areas of energy, food, water, and shelter and there's a tremendous amount of work to do domestically and globally and that’s how 501CTHREE got started. 


Bookshlf
: Can you tell us about The Water Box and how it works?


Drew FitzGerald
: Naturally when we were looking at the mission of 501CTHREE to be able to use story and our deployed innovation (that we either design ourselves or enlist someone else) we always want to look at the intersection of story and Energy, Food, Water and Shelter, and so naturally water was a place to look because we have so much water talent around us collecting over the decade, people from MIT and UCLA, and people from inside the JUST organization, so we looked and said some of the processes that we employ with JUST water are processes that we can also employ to help people that are also having water issues around the world, from water scarcity to contamination.  

Water, other than decarbonizing our energy grid, is really the second greatest challenge, and they're not in any way mutually exclusive - there's something called the energy water nexus. So we said let’s look around the world at where we can help, and we started speaking with some large and established water NGOs in DC and they said listen, we like where your heart is that you want to go to Sub-Saharan Africa and start to evaluate water issue there but where you can be most effective right now is in your own backyard, in America. There’s just not a lot of water NGOs in America, but look and uncover the shadow areas, we’re in the richest country in the world, but people here are not getting access to clean and safe water and obviously the most notable one, the global standard for malfeasance and lack of accountability and leadership is Flint, Michigan. The crisis in Flint was caused by a massive mistake by state and local leaders where people were painfully hurt and died because of those mistakes. It's thoroughly criminal what transpired. But Flint... it's one of hundreds of communities, largely black, brown and indigenous that are suffering similar problems like Flint for a variety of causations and it's also   a global problem. 

So we looked at Flint, and we didn’t want to be the guys going in who say “hey we’re here with a solution here it is.” At that time, and to some extent it still is, Flint was on edge. Everyone had gotten lied to, Mayors had lied to their people, corporations had lied, there was mistruth all over, and this is to a discrete population of people, largely African-American that were poisoned and you can’t just walk into a community like that and say we’re here we want to help, they’ve seen that game. So we learned through friends in Flint, who are now family, the way to go into a community in that moment was through the Faith-based community because those groups were the only ones that still maintained any semblance of trust. 

So then all of a sudden we’re looking at the intersection of us deploying water engineering solutions and networks of baptist churches. I didn’t see that coming. So we went in very privately and sat down with our friends and family at the First Trinity Baptist Church with Pastor Ezra Tillman Jr. and First Lady Catrina Tillman. They brought us in, sat us down and we observed how they were doing stuff, and we looked and said, in addition to being able to construct something on our end to purify water and deliver, free, clean and safe water to people, what we really need to do is some social reconstruction and build trust, and we went back and we realized it's not just a situation of “hey, here’s your filtration system, you can have it, here’s a gift.” We needed to be able to put the power in the hands of the people who were operating that machine to be able to test the water themselves with these handheld devices and they can publish a google doc that goes up on a website where anyone in the community whos about to go get some water from that machine can say “I know the Deacon who tested that water because I grew up with him, he lives around the corner from me.” The community takes a stake in their own water, it’s not Jaden and Drew going “trust us” this is clean water  - because a lot of things that are bad in water you can’t smell and you can’t taste. 

So we went back and we constructed something that was basically a support for something that is not only happening in Flint, but all over America - there are people giving out bottled water in Chicago, in Saint Louis, Jackson, Watts, in Downtown LA, in the Central Coast of California, and certainly Flint, Pittsburg, DC and on and on. There are people that do water drives for people that are largely black and brown communities, and so what we designed for them was a way to reduce the cost, the backbreaking labor, because water is very heavy and the people that are volunteers are older, and moving water around sucks. For example, when Flint happened, First Trinity Baptist Church bought a forklift -- what Church needs a forklift? They had a forklift because they were moving pallets of bottled water around and people would line up around the block in their cars to pick up two cases of water. And it’s a problem that we saw in 2014-15 when the news broke there was so much bottled water coming into Flint that it was almost uncontrollable. Tractor trailers were pulling in at midnight from a Church in Texas and didn't know where to put it - there was so much bottled water that it was overwhelming - and then what happened is over the years is Flint faded from the memory so that the cost and expense of keeping water for these constituents was unsustainable, and that’s the same situation that’s happening in all these other places too, so we designed a system that’s very mobile, it's’ very transparent, it’s open source, there's no intellectual property about it at all, no secret sauce. It’s a tried and true filtration that you’d see in any filtration system but it was designed and packaged in a way so that Deacons of the church or people that are Proctors at schools or people who run community centers can easily operate it, and it’s also designed in a way, and where we’re headed with this, is working with Autodesk to help create a global open source toolkit so that if a STEM class in Fiji wants to build a Waterbox they can download the tools and build their own Waterbox. That to us would be the success of the wider adoption of the Waterbox. 

The Waterbox works in Flint because it’s very easy to maintain and there's an endless amount of water, it’s not “hey here's two cases,” where you need to budget your water between cleaning, cooking, and stuff - two cases of water goes quick. We underestimate how much water we use in one day. This way, this machine, when properly maintained (which is not hard) can produce 10 gallons of water every minute - you come with a hundred gallon tank in your pickup and we’ll fill it up, any amount of water you want. The Waterbox can run 24/7 and can run for a decade. So they are nodes of water distribution that are free and can modulate depending on what the issue is in that particular market. You can dial it in to take out specific toxic things. 

So that’s how the waterbox got started and we’re it goes is Waterbox version one was made for the urban and built environment, Waterbox two expands to look at off-grid, battery plus solar, and these can be dialed up and dialed down, so our designs for an offgrid box are as important as our on-grid box specifically in communities that are much more rural, there tends to be a lot of issues on tribal lands where indigeounes people are suffering not just from access to water but access to power. So we're looking at partnerships for off-grid scenarios both here domestically, and there are conversations going on in Ghana, Uganda, India and Brazil. 

So that’s our Water initiative right now, and there are other parts for making what we’ve already done more innovative, the ability for us to add cloud based sensors so that we can look and see the quality and profile of the water with more accuracy which is a really important thing because it's a watchdog on public water systems, and that’s an important thing because in this time of IoT and data and with partnerships with UCLA and MIT we’re going to put together something nice that will have the ability to dot the country with these sensors to keep an eye on things. 

What gets me motivated about that, albeit a little too late, is that these sensors that we’re working on right now, had we had them in Flint in 2014, we believe that Flint would not have happened. There would have been a red flag that our nonprofit would have seen when everything was redlining and we would have rattled the cage and ring the alarm saying that this was a problem, but that did not happen. 


Bookshlf
: What are a few pieces of content that might help us understand the problems with clean water scarcity and accessibility in the US and can you talk a bit about the inequalities related to water?


Drew FitzGerald
: There are millions of resources to learn about water, there’s a lot of content out there and everyone should be interested in water and how it lives in their lives, because we, like electricity, take it for granted. Water has to do with the food we eat, it has to do with industry - the building I’m in right now needed a lotta energy and water to construct it and to operate it, etc. So when you start to get a better understanding of how water is in the world, you start to understand that the water that we have today is the water that we had thousands of years ago. It’s just always on the move. Whether it's condensation, whether it’s rain, whether it's snow, whether it's water, when it goes in the ocean in Santa Monica it’s going to end up in Dubai, or it’s going to wind up in Cape Town. And It’s really important, we have all the water we need, we just can’t drink a lot. Water is always going to be a growing threat and specifically as we look at our early days of 501CTHREE it’s important to look at our point of view on the marginalization and the inequality of access of water between white communities and black/brown and indigionaious communities, and that is a shocking thing. As we do our work it’s shocking to learn that people in Jackson, Mississippi are having trouble with water. It’s shocking that the difference between Watts and Beverly Hills is 15 miles, but their water quality is radically different. There is a very deep and long historical underpinning of race and access to water and that’s what we posit with our thesis at 501CTHREE RACE x

So water is just one component of the larger Climate Change conversation and it’s important to understand that there are big ideas being worked on, and there are people working in the local community and everyone in between, and that stack has to happen like an orchestra. I’m a huge fan of Nuclear Fusion - big proponent. I’ve done a lot of work in this space. Nuclear Fusion alone will not help us. It is dire that it does, but it has to be a part of the larger orchestra that all of us are a part of. And so when you look at that and want to start to become more acclimated, the one book that was really influential to both Jaden and I was Paul Hawken’s book Drawdown that is a must read if you want to understand how we get our hands around this. And it’s very easy to read, I recommend it to everyone and I’ve bought it probably 50 times. 

So that would be the first one. And there are ways for you to go in from small, medium, large, and extra large in terms of how deep you want to go. Project Drawdown is a very easy entryway. To get a good handle on on where we are now Bill Gates’ recent book How to Avoid a Climate Disaster is fantastic, and if you want to get deep in extra large you can start looking a bit more academic -- Vaclav Smil’s books are all about Energy & Civilization and they’re absolutely fascinating. You might have to take a knee after reading it, but you will come out richer at the end. And those are all about solutions. There is room for optimism in this space. And we [501CTHREE] are certainly playing a role in our little corner of the world and we hope to galvanize people in the cleantech space and have a generation that understands how to play a part. 


Bookshlf
: What are 501CTHREE’s plans for the future?


Drew FitzGerald
: So our mission from a media, content and storytelling standpoint is to be able to demystify things that we’re working on. Nuclear Fusion is a complicated subject but it doesn't have to be, it's something that everyone can participate in. So with us, we are going to constantly be deploying innovations in the energy, food, water, and shelter space, working with academic institutions and entrepreneurs to help them derisk their technologies. And that’s a really, really important thing in the Climate Change space because a lot of the solutions that need to be put in play have a little bit of a longer horizon and they are at risk of dying from lack of funding, it’s called the innovators valley of death - that one to 5 year period, and that is something that we will constantly be helping to bridge. I’m one of the founding advisors of the Prime Coalition which specifically looks at derisking early stage energy and water entrepreneurs, which sounds like a jumble of nerd salad, but it’s a really, really important thing - it actually threatens all of humanity. And so we’ll be working on that, and we’ll be working in collaboration with MIT and UCLA, and helping to speed innovations out of these environments, and helping with deployment. For example, the cluster sensor I mentioned for the Water Boxes. We’re going to deploy that in our Water Boxes this fall and that needs to happen and we can help the speed of innovation in our areas while making ourselves smarter and bringing our friends and family and anyone who's interested along so they can become smarter and more informed about social and environmental justice, and that will take me to my grave. 


Bookshlf
: With respect to climate change and water scarcity, the mainstream media often focuses only on the problems, leading to a disheartening outlook for the future. Where can we find content and resources that focus on solutions and help us remain optimistic about the road ahead?


Drew FitzGerald
: There’s a number of different climate outlets. Once you have a fundamental understanding of what the problem is, and you should get your fundamentals down, like you would with Arithmetic, English,etc, and once you have that fundamental understanding of what the problem is and what’s at stake, you should focus on the solution side of the house. Figure out how you can get involved, join the Sunrise Movement. Join 350, join Carbon180. Don’t be afraid of things that are happening at Harvard, or Caltech or Stanford, or Berkley, follow them , read up on them. What’s un-championed are these smart people across spectrums that are working on these problems. So you can get your base of doom scrolling, and there’s plenty of that, but get to the sunny side of the street and roll up your sleeves and say “How can I get involved?” “How can I understand this more?” Because it's a symphony, and everyone has a part to play. If you’re in a small town somewhere and you’re wondering if you can help, you can, there's a mayor, you can talk to them, there’s a school board, you can talk to them, you can be a champion of what you believe in even if your town only has a thousand people. Everyone can play a role and it’s that collective gestalt that will help us stave off things that are looking us square in the face. 


Bookshlf
: This is a great segue, and you touched on it a bit in the previous question, but understanding that we all have a responsibility to be “part of the symphony,” how can someone like myself get involved today and be part of the solution? What are some of the more immediate, actionable steps?


Drew FitzGerald
: First and foremost, Vote. Vote early and vote often. And when people think about voting, they think it’s just the presidential election, right? Understanding down the ticket, that there's as much that happens on the local level, as on the state level and the federal level and it all has an effect on how we’re going to get a handle on this and be leaders in the climate change space, like re-entering the Paris Accord. Voting and understanding the issues is one of the best ways that you can understand where people live and understand where the flow of power is from, DC all the way down to your backyard, how that has an affect on our ability to institute major things which are going to save us from this public health crisis, like Joe Biden’s infrastructure plan, its phenomenal, modernizing the electric grid is the biggest thing we can do in the US to get more renewables on the grid, it’s really nerdy, but it’s super, super important and it hasn’t been updated, it’s the equivalent of the cassette tape and we need to get to Spotify. We saw what happened in Texas. In the richest country in the world, people went without water and power for three days, and even worse in Mississippi, and that happened from an extreme weather event. When's the last time pipes froze in Houston, right? That’s ridiculous! And this is not the end of it. The concept of adaptability and resilience is something that we really need to play a role in. So if you are someone who wants to do something, certainly, I can’t underestimate voting, I also can’t underestimate the fact that in your backyard you can affect change as a first step, and it’s not just “I’m getting some solar panels,” it’s get involved, speak up, join the Sunrise Movement, get together with friends and organize, make your voices known. We see what’s happened over this last year, in the crazy year of the pandemic and inequity, we see what voices can do collectively, get with the winning team on this type of thing, understand where your power is, grab your friends and make a scrum. Come along and be a friend of 501CTHREE and we’ll pull you through. 


Bookshlf
: With billions of dollars being invested into clean-energy, clean-tech, and water conservation initiatives, what are some of the projects or technologies that excite you most?


Drew FitzGerald
: I’m excited about the opportunity to produce hydrogen cleanly, that’s a very important thing, I’m excited about the opportunity to then use that hydrogen to produce zero emissions cement and steel. I’m very excited because I have a soft spot in my heart for Nuclear Fusion. Nuclean Fusion is the Holy Grail of energy. The joke in the field of Nuclear and Applied Physics is that “Fusion is always 20 years away,” well it’s not. It’s here, and it’s now actionable. It was always just practical if XYZ were to happen magically. Well, XYZ has happened and now we’re in the process of it being actually applicable. It’s a very, very exciting energy use so when I look at it, I’m excited that people in the developing world can pull themselves out of poverty, but that can come with peril. When people rise out of poverty they have expectations and desires and wants that they should get. They want a car, they want lights and they want electricity, and they want education, and they want things that have a carbon footprint. So it's a race, when we start having more and more people that are going to have more benefits in their lives, it’s a race to try and get those desires to be powered by emissions free power, rather than fossil fuels like coal, oil and gas. 

And so, I’m excited about the ability to start bringing on more advances in decarbonized energy and that trickles down to almost everything on the planet. Basically almost every woe that we have, other than social justice woes, are energy problems, energy poverty problems, and so I’m really excited to see the advances there and we’re going to play our part to try to speed them to the grid. 


Bookshlf
: What types of Shelves does 501CTHREE plan to curate on Bookshlf?


Drew FitzGerald
: Jaden and I both come from art backgrounds, I went to art school, Jaden is demonstrably an artist. One of the very first times I went to MIT, I was toured around a place called Greentown Labs, it’s legendary in the Climate space, and I met a guy who was explaining his innovation to me, it was “waste heat conversion from exhaust pipes,” and I can speak a bit more eloquently about it now, but back then it was foreign to me, and we we’re getting into the deeper sciences of how it worked and I was like “Hold on, slow down dude I went to art school,” and he kinda stopped and became a little bit irreverent and said “No, artists and engineers are much more akin than they think they are. If you’re looking at a blank canvas, they're looking at a paper with trig or calc equation on it.” Artists and engineers operate in the same sphere because they want to solve problems to achieve a goal.” So to answer your question, I’ve since steeped myself in science and technology all around civil and environmental engineering and plasma science and fusion, and I would hope we would be able to constantly be curating things that help people understand some of the deeper science, but also to talk about our interests as artists, because there is a lifestyle to being impactful, it’s cool to like Supreme and also the PlasmaScience and Material Science departments at MIT. Good is the new cool, so our Bookshlf will be a myriad of things that range from the arts to really nerdy Climate Change stuff, and we hope to curate media, content and music that will help people demystify their minds about things they can do in terms of the climate fight and justice. 


Bookshlf
: Who is the one person’s Bookshlf (deceased or alive) you would want to follow and why?


Drew FitzGerald
: There’s a couple? Can we do Bookshelves? 


Bookshlf
: Absolutely


Drew FitzGerald
: Naturally I would love to follow Thomas Edison’s, but at the same time I’d follow Tom Robbins, and I’d for sure follow Bill Gates’, I’d follow da Vinci’s, I’d follow Dieter Rams, I’d follow Herman Miller, I’d follow Brunelleschi’s, I’d follow Chuck Close’s, and I’d follow Vaclav Smil, and of course Thom York.